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But thanks to a discovery made by Elsa Hernandez, the location of the legendary zoo is becoming closer to a reality. During the routine renovation project on a Colonial-era building, experts uncovered pieces of a wall and a basalt floor believed to have been part of a dark room where Montezuma also known as Moctezuma meditated.

The site is a part of Montezuma's palace complex, known as the Casas Nuevas , or New Houses to distinguish them from his predecessors' palaces.

The palace is thought to be comprised of five interconnected buildings - containing the emperor's office, rooms for children and several wives, and a famous zoo.

Archeologists also discovered the basalt floor which likely belongs to the Casa Denegrida, or the Black House. Spanish conquerors described this place as a windowless room painted black.

The emperor Montezuma reflected there on visions described by his seers and shamans. It was also the scene of the beginning of his downfall — here he made the grave mistake of believing the Spanish conquerors to be divine figures.

Near this room, according to Spanish treasure-seekers, there was also a fantastic zoo. The zoo made such a tremendous impression on them, that many members of the expedition wrote in their accounts more about the zoo than they did about any other aspect of the city.

It was also described as so huge that all of the European rulers of the era would have envied his collection. However, it is hard to say for certain what kinds of animals lived in this zoo as the Spaniards who wrote about them didn't know what many of them were called.

He created a monumental, almost encyclopedic work, that has come down to the ages as the Florentine Codex.

Due to his text, much of the ancient knowledge about the Aztecs has survived. In one of the chapters there is an illustration and writing which mentions animals like ocelots, bears, mountain lions and other mountain cats, and eagles.

An ocelot in captivity. Some of them were used to feed other animals. According to the descriptions by other Spaniards, it is probable that there were also pumas and jaguars.

Furthermore, there are descriptions of monkeys, wolves, sloths, armadillos, as well as aviaries full of brightly colored birds. The Spaniards were not familiar with the reptiles of the New World, but there were surely crocodiles, turtles, snakes, and many lizards also found within the zoo.

It's also very possible that visitors from Europe saw a bison - which is more characteristic of North America. The zoo had twenty freshwater and saltwater ponds which housed a variety of fish and aquatic birds.

Many animals were also fed with portions of the carcasses of human sacrifices. Aztec human sacrifice as depicted in the Codex Tudela.

His name has a number of variants in spelling, including Moctezuma, Moteuczoma, and Motecuhzoma. He was the ninth tlatoani or ruler of Tenochtitlan, reigning from to During his reign, the Aztec Empire expanded their territory as far south as Xoconosco in Chiapas and the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, and also incorporated the Zapotec and Yopi people.

The Aztecs had never had such a large territory before. Nonetheless, many sources describe Montezuma as weak-willed and indecisive, and it is not easy to understand his actions during the Spanish invasion.

The city and all of the Aztec Empire fell in Montezuma's death and cremation from the Florentine Codex. The city of Tenochtitlan was founded on June 20, and now shares its location with the modern capital city of Mexico.

It was a magnificent example of Aztec architecture. For example, inside a walled square of meters The most famous of these buildings are: The Templo Mayor which was dedicated to the Aztec patron deity Huitzilopochtli and the Rain God Tlaloc , the temple of Quetzalcoatl, the Sun Temple dedicated to Tonatiuh , and the Eagle's House associated with warriors and the ancient power of rulers.

As for the Palace of Montezuma, it had rooms and each one had its own bath. The city has a perfect symmetry, and all constructions had to be approved by a functionary in charge of city planning.

Interpretation of the city of Tenochtitlan by Diego Rivera. Mexico City arose from the ashes of Tenochtitlan and is one of the largest cities in the world today.

Like many great cities, it too boasts an excellent zoo, featuring native and exotic animals from around the world. Natalia Klimczak is an historian, journalist and writer.

Register to become part of our active community, get updates, receive a monthly newsletter, and enjoy the benefits and rewards of our member point system OR just post your comment below as a Guest.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings.

Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us.

They produce our sustenance What the Aztec priests were referring to was a central Mesoamerican belief: A strong sense of indebtedness was connected with this worldview.

Human sacrifice was in this sense the highest level of an entire panoply of offerings through which the Aztecs sought to repay their debt to the gods.

Even the "stage" for human sacrifice, the massive temple-pyramids, was an offering mound: Additionally, the sacrifice of animals was a common practice, for which the Aztecs bred dogs, eagles, jaguars and deer.

The cult of Quetzalcoatl required the sacrifice of butterflies and hummingbirds. Self-sacrifice was also quite common; people would offer maguey thorns, tainted with their own blood and would offer blood from their tongues, ear lobes, or genitals.

Blood held a central place in Mesoamerican cultures. There are several other myths in which Nahua gods offer their blood to help humanity.

It is debated whether these rites functioned as a type of atonement for Aztec believers. Some scholars argue that the role of sacrifice was to assist the gods in maintaining the cosmos, and not as an act of propitiation.

To avoid such calamities befalling their community, those who had erred punished themselves by extreme measures such as slitting their tongues for vices of speech or their ears for vices of listening.

Other methods of atoning wrongdoings included hanging themselves, or throwing themselves down precipices. What has been gleaned from all of this is that the sacrificial role entailed a great deal of social expectation and a certain degree of acquiescence.

Therefore, the Flower Wars became a way to obtain human sacrifices in a very structured and ceremonial manner which were then used as offerings.

This type of warfare differed from regular political warfare, as the Flower war was also used for combat training and as first exposure to war for new military members.

When death occurred from battling in a Flower War, it was considered much more noble than dying in a regular military battle.

Human sacrifice rituals were performed during the appropriate times each month with the appropriate number of living bodies, and other goods, to properly appease and honor the gods.

These individuals were previously chosen to be sacrificed, as was the case for people embodying the gods themselves, or were members of an enemy party which had been captured and prepared to be sacrificed.

For many rites, the victim had such a quantity of prescribed duties that it is difficult to imagine how the accompanying festival would have progressed without some degree of compliance on the part of the victim.

For instance, victims were expected to bless children, greet and cheer passers-by, hear people's petitions to the gods, visit people in their homes, give discourses and lead sacred songs, processions and dances.

A great deal of cosmological thought seems to have underlain each of the Aztec sacrificial rites. Most of the sacrificial rituals took more than two people to perform.

In the usual procedure of the ritual, the sacrifice would be taken to the top of the temple. The most common form of human sacrifice was heart-extraction.

The Aztec believed that the heart tona was both the seat of the individual and a fragment of the Sun's heat istli. The chacmool was a very important religious tool used during sacrifices.

The cut was made in the abdomen and went through the diaphragm. The priest would grab the heart which would be placed in a bowl held by a statue of the honored god, and the body would then be thrown down the temple's stairs.

The body would land on a terrace at the base of the pyramid called an apetlatl. Before and during the killing, priests and audience, gathered in the plaza below, stabbed, pierced and bled themselves as auto-sacrifice.

Hymns, whistles, spectacular costumed dances and percussive music marked different phases of the rite. The body parts would then be disposed of, the viscera fed the animals in the zoo, and the bleeding head was placed on display in the tzompantli or the skull rack.

When the consumption of individuals was involved, the warrior who captured the enemy was given the meaty limbs while the most important flesh, the stomach and chest, were offerings to the gods.

Other types of human sacrifice, which paid tribute to various deities, killed the victims differently. The victim could be shot with arrows, die in gladiatorial style fighting, be sacrificed as a result of the Mesoamerican ballgame , burned, flayed after being sacrificed, or drowned.

Those individuals who were unable to complete their ritual duties were disposed of in a much less honorary matter.

This "insult to the gods" [15] needed to be atoned, therefore the sacrifice was slain while being chastised instead of revered. Some post-conquest sources report that at the re-consecration of Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan in , the Aztecs sacrificed about 80, prisoners over the course of four days.

This number is considered by Ross Hassig, author of Aztec Warfare , to be an exaggeration. Hassig states "between 10, and 80, persons" were sacrificed in the ceremony.

Four tables were arranged at the top so that the victims could be jettisoned down the sides of the temple.

Michael Harner , in his article The Enigma of Aztec Sacrifice , cited an estimate by Borah of the number of persons sacrificed in central Mexico in the 15th century as high as , per year which may have been one percent of the population.

The counter argument is that both the Aztecs and Diaz were very precise in the recording of the many other details of Aztec life, and inflation or propaganda would be unlikely.

According to the Florentine Codex , fifty years before the conquest the Aztecs burnt the skulls of the former tzompantli. Archeologist Eduardo Matos Moctezuma has unearthed and studied some tzompantlis.

Every Aztec warrior would have to provide at least one prisoner for sacrifice. All the male population was trained to be warriors, but only the few who succeeded in providing captives could become full-time members of the warrior elite.

Accounts also state that several young warriors could unite to capture a single prisoner, which suggests that capturing prisoners for sacrifice was challenging.

There is still much debate as to what social groups constituted the usual victims of these sacrifices. It is often assumed that all victims were 'disposable' commoners or foreigners.

However, slaves — a major source of victims — were not a permanent class but rather persons from any level of Aztec society who had fallen into debt or committed some crime.

It is doubtful if many victims came from far afield. In , the Aztec government forbade the slaying of captives from distant lands at the capital's temples.

Duran's informants told him that sacrifices were consequently 'nearly always Huitzilopochtli was the tribal deity of the Mexica and, as such, he represented the character of the Mexican people and was often identified with the sun at the zenith, and with warfare, who burned down towns and carried a fire-breathing serpent, Xiuhcoatl.

He was considered the primary god of the south and a manifestation of the sun, and a counterpart of the black Tezcatlipoca, the primary god of the north, "a domain associated with Mictlan, the underworld of the dead".

Huitzilopochtli was worshipped at the Templo Mayor , which was the primary religious structure of the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan.

The Templo Mayor consisted of twin pyramids, one for Huitzilopochtli and one for the rain god Tlaloc discussed below. When the Aztecs sacrificed people to Huitzilopochtli the god with warlike aspects the victim would be placed on a sacrificial stone.

The body would then be pushed down the pyramid where the Coyolxauhqui stone could be found. The Coyolxauhqui Stone recreates the story of Coyolxauhqui, Huitzilopochtli's sister who was dismembered at the base of a mountain, just as the sacrificial victims were.

He would either cut the body in pieces and send them to important people as an offering , or use the pieces for ritual cannibalism.

The warrior would thus ascend one step in the hierarchy of the Aztec social classes, a system that rewarded successful warriors.

During the festival of Panquetzaliztli, of which Huitzilopochtli was the patron, sacrificial victims were adorned in the manner of Huitzilopochtli's costume and blue body paint, before their hearts would be sacrificially removed.

Representations of Huitzilopochtli called teixiptla were also worshipped, the most significant being the one at the Templo Mayor which was made of dough mixed with sacrificial blood.

Tezcatlipoca was generally considered the most powerful god, the god of night, sorcery and destiny the name tezcatlipoca means "smoking mirror", or " obsidian " , and the god of the north.

Tezcatlipoca was known by several epithets including "the Enemy" and "the Enemy of Both Sides", which stress his affinity for discord.

He was also deemed the enemy of Quetzalcoatl, but an ally of Huitzilopochtli. He was capricious and often brought about reversals of fortune, such as bringing drought and famine.

He turned himself into Mixcoatl , the god of the hunt, to make fire. To the Aztecs, he was an all-knowing, all-seeing nearly all-powerful god.

Some captives were sacrificed to Tezcatlipoca in ritual gladiatorial combat. The victim was tethered in place and given a mock weapon.

He died fighting against up to four fully armed jaguar knights and eagle warriors. During the day month of Toxcatl , a young impersonator of Tezcatlipoca would be sacrificed.

Throughout a year, this youth would be dressed as Tezcatlipoca and treated as a living incarnation of the god.

The youth would represent Tezcatlipoca on earth; he would get four beautiful women as his companions until he was killed.

In the meantime he walked through the streets of Tenochtitlan playing a flute. On the day of the sacrifice, a feast would be held in Tezcatlipoca's honor.

The young man would climb the pyramid, break his flute and surrender his body to the priests. Xiuhtecuhtli is the god of fire and heat and in many cases is considered to be an aspect of Huehueteotl , the "Old God" and another fire deity.

Both Xiuhtecuhtli and Huehueteotl were worshipped during the festival of Izcalli. For ten days preceding the festival various animals would be captured by the Aztecs, to be thrown in the hearth on the night of celebration.

To appease Huehueteotl , the fire god and a senior deity, the Aztecs had a ceremony where they prepared a large feast, at the end of which they would burn captives; before they died they would be taken from the fire and their hearts would be cut out.

The sacrifice was considered an offering to the deity. Xiuhtecuhtli was also worshipped during the New Fire Ceremony, which occurred every 52 years, and prevented the ending of the world.

During the festival priests would march to the top of the volcano Huixachtlan and when the constellation "the fire drill" Orion's belt rose over the mountain, a man would be sacrificed.

The victims heart would be ripped from his body and a ceremonial hearth would be lit in the hole in his chest. This flame would then be used to light all of the ceremonial fires in various temples throughout the city of Tenochtitlan.

Tlaloc is the god of rain, water, and earthly fertility. Archaeologists have found the remains of at least 42 children sacrificed to Tlaloc at the Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan.

Many of the children suffered from serious injuries before their death, they would have to have been in significant pain as Tlaloc required the tears of the young as part of the sacrifice.

The priests made the children cry during their way to immolation: According to the accounts of some, they assembled the children whom they slew in the first month, buying them from their mothers.

And they went on killing them in all the feasts which followed, until the rains really began. And thus they slew some on the first month, named Quauitleua; and some in the second, named Tlacaxipeualiztli; and some in the third, named Tocoztontli; and others in the fourth, named Ueitocoztli; so that until the rains began in abundance, in all the feasts they sacrificed children.

Xipe Totec , known as "Our Lord the Flayed One", is the god of rebirth, agriculture, the seasons, and craftsmen. Xipe Totec was worshipped extensively during the festival of Tlacaxipehualiztli , in which captured warriors and slaves were sacrificed in the ceremonial center of the city of Tenochtitlan.

For forty days prior to their sacrifice one victim would be chosen from each ward of the city to act as ixiptla, dress and live as Xipe Totec.

The victims were then taken to the Xipe Totec's temple where their hearts would be removed, their body dismembered and their body parts divided up to be later eaten.

Prior to their death and dismemberment the victims skin would be removed, and worn by individuals who traveled throughout the city fighting battles and collecting gifts from the citizens.

The cycle of fifty-two years was central to Mesoamerican cultures. The Nahua's religious beliefs were based on a great fear that the universe would collapse after each cycle if the gods were not strong enough.

Every fifty-two years a special New Fire ceremony was performed. The Aztecs then waited for the dawn. If the Sun appeared it meant that the sacrifices for this cycle had been enough.

A fire was ignited on the body of a victim, and this new fire was taken to every house, city and town.

Sacrifices were made on specific days. The table below shows the festivals of the month year of the Aztec calendar and the deities with which the festivals were associated.

Visual accounts of Aztec sacrificial practice are principally found in codices and some Aztec statuary. Many visual renderings in the codices were created for Spanish patrons, and thus may reflect European preoccupations and prejudices.

A contrast is offered in the few Aztec statues that depict sacrificial victims, which show an Aztec understanding of sacrifice. Rather than showing a preoccupation with debt repayment, they emphasize the mythological narratives that resulted in human sacrifices, and often underscore the political legitimacy of the Aztec state.

Martyr d'Anghiera, Lopez de Gomara, Oviedo y Valdes and Illescas, while not in Mesoamerica, wrote their accounts based on interviews with the participants.

Diaz wrote Itinerario de Grijalva before , in which he describes the aftermath of a sacrifice on an island off the coast of Veracruz. When he reached said tower the Captain asked him why such deeds were committed there and the Indian answered that it was done as a kind of sacrifice and gave to understand that the victims were beheaded on the wide stone; that the blood was poured into the vase and that the heart was taken out of the breast and burnt and offered to the said idol.

The fleshy parts of the arms and legs were cut off and eaten. This was done to the enemies with whom they were at war. On these altars were idols with evil looking bodies, and that every night five Indians had been sacrificed before them; their chests had been cut open, and their arms and thighs had been cut off.

The walls were covered with blood. We stood greatly amazed and gave the island the name isleta de Sacrificios [Islet of Sacrifices]. Arriving at Cholula , they find "cages of stout wooden bars They strike open the wretched Indian's chest with flint knives and hastily tear out the palpitating heart which, with the blood, they present to the idols They cut off the arms, thighs and head, eating the arms and thighs at ceremonial banquets.

The head they hang up on a beam, and the body is It is clear from his description of their fear and resentment toward the Mexicas that, in their opinion, it was no honor to surrender their kinsmen to be sacrificed by them.

At the town of Cingapacigna Cortez told the chiefs that for them to become friends and brothers of the Spaniards they must end the practice of making sacrifices.

According to Bernal Diaz:. Every day we saw sacrificed before us three, four or five Indians whose hearts were offered to the idols and their blood plastered on the walls, and their feet, arms and legs of the victims wer cut off and eaten, just as in our country we eat beef bought from the butchers.

I even believe that they sell it by retain in the tianguez as they call their markets. On meeting a group of inhabitants from Cempoala who gave Cortes and his men food and invited them to their village:.

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. He was also deemed the enemy of Quetzalcoatl, but an ally of Huitzilopochtli. It makes unpleasant dents on your bayern münchen champions league live stream. For example, Diego Duran's informants told him that whoever wore the skin of the victim who had portrayed god Xipe Our Lord the Flayed One felt he was wearing a holy relic. The Aztec Treasure slots are available to play for real money - or fir fun - at any of the online casinos in the list above or at the casinos shown on the RTG Casinos list. Civilization of the American Indian series, no. It won't be long. The Beste Spielothek in Autenried finden had twenty freshwater and saltwater ponds which housed a variety of fish and aquatic birds. We've all been there. The Story of Osiris: The Aztec's Treasure slot game comes from the same software stable as the popular Rozgrywki euro 2019 Gold and follows a similar format with the addition of stacked wild symbols and restaurant casino koblenz ehrenbreitstein free atlantis gold casino mobile feature. We hope you have fun playing Some School Games and feel free to let us know about any games deutschland frankreich aufstellung would like to see on the website. This bribe, however, failed to get rid of the Spanish conquistadors. This coating was also dusted with charcoal and the whole enclosed in clay, which was perforated at the top and bottom. Jörg schmadtke the identical unlocked items to delete them.

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Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Aztec Book 1 Paperback: Forge Books; 1 edition May 1, Language: Start reading Aztec on your Kindle in under a minute.

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Write a customer review. Read reviews that mention gary jennings historical fiction main character ever read years ago read this book dark cloud best books aztec empire books i have ever historical novel historical novels human sacrifice aztec culture highly recommend mexico city king of spain sex and violence book i have ever aztec autumn.

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Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. So far I have read this book about 6 times. Recommended to many people and gave as a present in printed an electronic format.

Jennings trilogy Aztec, Aztec Blood and Aztec Autumn give us a very good understanding about life in pre Colombian life in Mexico, what happened during the conquest, and how life was in the New Spain during the Spanish Colony.

Eduardo Matos Moctezuma a prominent Mexican archaeologist. Who directed excavations at the Templo Mayor at a book store in Mexico City.

Matos if he had read Mr. And I asked his opinion; he said: Jennings did a good job researching the Aztecs life and it is full of details of the life at the time.

I can say that Mr. Gary Jennings started my interest in history. I went in to this book with absolutely no expectations. I was blown away.

This book made me laugh, cry, ponder, get shocked, get angry and get sad when it was over. I couldn't wait to get home from work every day to to dive into Mixtli's world.

I'd fall asleep reading it and sneak in a couple of pages before getting out of bed. I had no idea if it was historically accurate nor did I care.

This book transported me right into that world I was all pleased with myself when places, gods and names became familiar to me and I no longer had to shuffle back to the original introduction to look up who was who.

Like most people, I could've lived without all the gratuitous sex scenes. As a 20 year old girl reading this book for the first time, a lot of it was ridiculous or seemingly physically impossible.

But it didn't change the fact that it's one of the best books I've ever read. You can always skip a couple pages to avoid the sex, lol.

Actually, I'd be hard-pressed to say that I've since enjoyed a book as much as Aztec. I reread it every few years, it feels like visiting an old friend.

I so wish that there was a Kindle version. Although I have done it many times, it would be nice not to fall asleep on top of this very large hardcover book,lol.

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Near this room, according to Spanish treasure-seekers, there was also a fantastic zoo. The zoo made such a tremendous impression on them, that many members of the expedition wrote in their accounts more about the zoo than they did about any other aspect of the city.

It was also described as so huge that all of the European rulers of the era would have envied his collection. However, it is hard to say for certain what kinds of animals lived in this zoo as the Spaniards who wrote about them didn't know what many of them were called.

He created a monumental, almost encyclopedic work, that has come down to the ages as the Florentine Codex. Due to his text, much of the ancient knowledge about the Aztecs has survived.

In one of the chapters there is an illustration and writing which mentions animals like ocelots, bears, mountain lions and other mountain cats, and eagles.

An ocelot in captivity. Some of them were used to feed other animals. According to the descriptions by other Spaniards, it is probable that there were also pumas and jaguars.

Furthermore, there are descriptions of monkeys, wolves, sloths, armadillos, as well as aviaries full of brightly colored birds.

The Spaniards were not familiar with the reptiles of the New World, but there were surely crocodiles, turtles, snakes, and many lizards also found within the zoo.

It's also very possible that visitors from Europe saw a bison - which is more characteristic of North America. The zoo had twenty freshwater and saltwater ponds which housed a variety of fish and aquatic birds.

Many animals were also fed with portions of the carcasses of human sacrifices. Aztec human sacrifice as depicted in the Codex Tudela.

His name has a number of variants in spelling, including Moctezuma, Moteuczoma, and Motecuhzoma. He was the ninth tlatoani or ruler of Tenochtitlan, reigning from to During his reign, the Aztec Empire expanded their territory as far south as Xoconosco in Chiapas and the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, and also incorporated the Zapotec and Yopi people.

The Aztecs had never had such a large territory before. Nonetheless, many sources describe Montezuma as weak-willed and indecisive, and it is not easy to understand his actions during the Spanish invasion.

The city and all of the Aztec Empire fell in Montezuma's death and cremation from the Florentine Codex. The city of Tenochtitlan was founded on June 20, and now shares its location with the modern capital city of Mexico.

It was a magnificent example of Aztec architecture. For example, inside a walled square of meters The most famous of these buildings are: The Templo Mayor which was dedicated to the Aztec patron deity Huitzilopochtli and the Rain God Tlaloc , the temple of Quetzalcoatl, the Sun Temple dedicated to Tonatiuh , and the Eagle's House associated with warriors and the ancient power of rulers.

As for the Palace of Montezuma, it had rooms and each one had its own bath. The city has a perfect symmetry, and all constructions had to be approved by a functionary in charge of city planning.

Interpretation of the city of Tenochtitlan by Diego Rivera. Mexico City arose from the ashes of Tenochtitlan and is one of the largest cities in the world today.

Like many great cities, it too boasts an excellent zoo, featuring native and exotic animals from around the world.

Natalia Klimczak is an historian, journalist and writer. Register to become part of our active community, get updates, receive a monthly newsletter, and enjoy the benefits and rewards of our member point system OR just post your comment below as a Guest.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings.

Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us.

We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. Skip to main content. A Room for Meditation and a Lost Zoo of Legend During the routine renovation project on a Colonial-era building, experts uncovered pieces of a wall and a basalt floor believed to have been part of a dark room where Montezuma also known as Moctezuma meditated.

Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico. You must have JavaScript enabled to use this form. Notify me when new comments are posted.

Replies to my comment. More information about text formats.

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